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January 17, 2019
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Photo – Hungo Pavi

This rock wall is part of the Hungo Pavi Pueblo at Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. It’s about 3 feet (.9 meters) thick. Part of the building has collapsed, revealing the inner structure of the wall.

As I mentioned yesterday with my photo of a wall at Chetro Ketl Pueblo, the amount of rock they had to gather is amazing. They didn’t make walls that were rock shells filled with dirt or rubble. Their walls were rock, through and through. It takes a lot of dedication and determination to build structures like this.

Let me know if you have any questions about using, or taking, photographs.

Bring the world into your home and office by purchasing this, and many other photos, at www.JeffColburn.com

Have Fun,
Jeff

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January 16, 2019
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Photo – Chetro Ketl Pueblo Wall

This rock wall is part of the Chetro Ketl Pueblo at Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. It’s about 12 feet (3.6 meters) tall and 3 feet (.9 meters) thick.

At every pueblo I visited, I was constantly amazed at how many tons of rock the Native Americans carried, by hand, to create their homes. It was a Herculean effort that should not be underestimated.

Let me know if you have any questions about using, or taking, photographs.

Bring the world into your home and office by purchasing this, and many other photos, at www.JeffColburn.com

Have Fun,
Jeff

#photo #image #NewMexico #photography #photographs #indian#NativeAmerican #pueblo #ruin #ruins #petroglyph #ancient #ChacoCanyon #ChetroKetl #canyon

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January 10, 2019
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Photo – Chaco Canyon Petroglyph

Hi Everyone,

Here’s a lizard petroglyph I found on the cliff wall as I walked from Chetro Ketl to Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. And see that hole in the wall? There used to be a structure there, and a support beam was put into the hole to hold up the structure. The local Native Americans made many of these holes along the cliff wall to support various structures.

Let me know if you have any questions about using, or taking, photographs.

Bring the world into your home and office by purchasing this, and many other photos, at www.JeffColburn.com

Have Fun,
Jeff

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January 9, 2019
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Photo – Canyon De Chelly

Hi Everyone,

Here’s a shot of some interesting rock formations at Canyon de Chelly, near the White House Ruins. It’s called White House because of the light-colored plaster on some of the rooms. The Navajo call the site Kinii’ ni gai which translates to White House.

Let me know if you have any questions about using, or taking, photographs.

Bring the world into your home or office by purchasing this, and many other photos, at www.JeffColburn.com

Have Fun,
Jeff

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January 7, 2019
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Jeff’s New Mexico Adventures – Aztec Ruins

Like the Salmon Ruins, the Aztec Ruins National Monument (www.nps.gov/azru/index.htm) is located in the city of Aztec and are easy to reach. There’s even a small picnic area.

These ruins are really amazing. They are well preserved, and an asphalt walkway leads you around the buildings. This makes most of the area handicap accessible, except for going into some of the ruins. We were there for several hours, and could easily have spent the entire day experiencing the site.

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Old floor beams.

I do want to give you one warning about exploring Native American ruins. Indians seem to love small doorways. By small, I mean the average doorway is 24 inches (0.6 meters) wide and 36 inches (0.9 meters) tall. And you don’t just step through these doorways. They are built into walls that are 24-36 inches (0.6-0.9 meters) thick. So someone like me, who is almost 6 feet (1.8 meters) tall, had to crawl through the doorways, with a 25 pound (11.3 kilograms) camera pack on my back and work at pulling myself out of the other side.

At Aztec, I went through one section with four doorways, then returned through them, and the same with another section of three doorways. After going through those fourteen doorways my thighs were shot for two days. The next day, I was at another ruin where one section had about fifteen doorways. I walked around the outside of the ruins.

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These low doorways will test your thighs.

Part of reason for the small doorways was to help with temperature control in the heat of summer and the cold of winter. And I’m guessing that the average Indian, 1,000 years ago, was about 5′ 1″ (1.54 meters) tall, maybe 100 pounds (45 kilograms) and in great shape. So a small doorway was no big deal to them.

The ruins at Aztec are in very good shape, and the Great Kiva has been completely rebuilt. When you’re inside, you feel like you’ve gone back in time. By the back door is a pillar with a button you can push to hear some Native American music. It’s a magical experience to be in this kiva and hear the music.

I also have to say that the architectural and engineering skills of the Native Americans were truly amazing. At most ruins you will find three and four story buildings, and the roof of the Great Kiva at Aztec weighs 95 tons (86,182.55 metric tons). Having the skills to build this between the late 1000s A.D. and 1200s A.D. is almost unimaginable.

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Besides the Great Kiva, be sure to visit:

  • West Ruin – This is the largest of the houses with at least 500 rooms.
  • Hubbard Tri-Wall Site – This is one of the few tri-wall structures in the Southwest.
  • The Tunnel – This is what I call a hallway that’s long and cool with a great breeze. I felt like I was in a cave, and loved it.

The Aztec Ruins are a UNESCO Word Heritage site, and well worth a visit.

Have you been here? What would you like to tell my reader about this location?

Have Fun,
Jeff

P.S. Another great thing to do in the Aztec area is to go in search of sandstone arches. There are over 400 arches of all sizes around Aztec. You can pick up a brochure in various places that gives directions to seven areas that have arches, and go here too http://aztecnm.com/Arches/. We went to the Pilares Canyon area in a passenger car with no problem, but be careful as there are patches of sand on the dirt road where you could get stuck. While in Pilares Canyon we also found petroglyphs. I love to discover and photograph them.

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One of the arches.

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January 3, 2019
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Photo – Aztec Arches 2

Here’s another of the over 400 arches found in the Aztec arch area, near the town of Aztec in New Mexico. It’s a small one, off on the right. You can get a brochure that will tell you how to take several self-guided tours. The two tours we went on were no problem for our passenger car. But if you go, keep an eye out for sand and ruts in the road.

Let me know if you have any questions about using, or taking, photographs.

You can purchase this, and many other photos, at www.JeffColburn.com

Have Fun,
Jeff

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January 2, 2019
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Photo – Canyon de Shelly

These are the White House Ruins at Canyon de Shelly, Arizona. The geology at Canyon de Shelly is really amazing.

Let me know if you have any questions about using, or taking, photographs.

You can purchase this, and many other photos, at www.JeffColburn.com

Have Fun,
Jeff

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December 27, 2018
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Photo – Spider Rock

This 830 foot (253 meter) rock spire is Spider Rock at Canyon De Shelly. Spider Woman is supposed to live in the crack between the two rocks. Every day she comes out, casts her web and catches naughty children and eats them. Kind of a Boogyman on steroids.

On a brighter side, she taught the local Native Americans how to weave. It really is an amazing site to see in person.

Let me know if you have any questions about using, or taking, photographs.

You can purchase this, and many other photos, at www.JeffColburn.com

Have Fun,
Jeff

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December 26, 2018
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Photo – Aztec Arches 1

Here’s one of the over 400 arches found in the Aztec arch area, near the town of Aztec in New Mexico. You can get a brochure that will tell you how to take several self-guided tours. The two tours we went on were no problem for our passenger car. But if you go, keep an eye out for sand and ruts in the road.

Let me know if you have any questions about using, or taking, photographs.

You can purchase this, and many other photos, at www.JeffColburn.com

Have Fun,
Jeff

#photo #image #NewMexico #photography #photographs #aztec #arches

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December 18, 2018
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Comments Off on Jeff’s New Mexico Adventures – Salmon Ruins

Jeff’s New Mexico Adventures – Salmon Ruins

One of the nice things about the Salmon Ruins (www.SalmonRuins.com) is that they are in the town of Bloomfield, so they’re easy to get to. No driving on washboard dirt roads, and no chance of being featured in one of those, “What they did wrong that had them lost in the desert for two weeks” television shows.

When you pay for admission, be sure to borrow a copy of their guide. It’s about twelve full sized pages and filled with a huge amount of information on everything you will see. If you are any kind of history buff, you will love all of the information in the guide.

After you leave the museum and walk down the ramp to the ruins, you’ll see that the area is rustic. You’ll be walking on dirt. There are no paved walkways as some ruins have, but there is a trail to follow. Start off by going to the left to explore the Pioneer Homestead area.

Here you will see several small structures that early pioneers built for themselves and their ranch hands. There’s a pioneer home, bunkhouse and small houses for the ranch hands. As with most things back then, they are small. The houses for the ranch hands are really one small room. I’m always amazed how, in about 100years, we’ve gone from this to a couple feeling they have to have a 2,000 to3,000 square foot house on five acres of land, just for the two of them.

Around these pioneer structures you will also see a couple different kinds of kivas that the Indians made, and simpler structures made of sticks, branches and animal hide. Once you’re done in this area, head on over to the Ruins.

In the late 11th century, people from the Chaco Canyon area came here and built the Salmon Ruins. After they left, other Native Americans in the area used the site. In the late 13th century, the Ruins were abandoned for the last time. Nothing was done with the Ruins until archeologists started studying them in the 1970’s.

You can walk into some of the rooms, which is a great way to get a close-up view of how they built the walls, and what it feels like to live in the rooms. Imagine living here, and how it would feel to have a bedroom and living quarts combo that’s probably the same size as the bathroom in your home.

The small stones were a building style used by the last inhabitants.

While you’re here, be sure to check out their gift shop and museum. They also have something you don’t often find, a research library. If you need historical information about the area, this is the place to go.

I highly recommend that you visit the Salmon Ruins. It really gives you an accurate idea of how people lived so many years ago.

Have you been here? What would you like to tell my reader about this location?

Have Fun,
Jeff

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